Spring Ministry and MA Formation courses at AMBS

Spring 2014

Growth in Ministry  INT601A and INT601B

One credit hour each semester — Loren Johns and Andy Brubacher Kaethler
The primary focus of this yearlong seminar is the completion of the formation portfolio, an integration paper, and the senior interview process required for graduation. This seminar provides the structure for students to focus intentionally on the growth and integration of the knowing, doing, and being aspects of their learning, with particular reference to their ministry vocation.

MDiv Thesis Research INT609

Six hours, upon completion of thesis
A student enrolled in the MDiv program with a Theological Studies concentration may petition to write a thesis. He or she must register for this research in each semester following the approval of the petition until he or she completes and successfully defends the thesis.

MDiv Thesis Extension INT609A

No credit
A student must register for MDIV Thesis extension if unable to complete the thesis during the two semesters registered for the MDIV Thesis Research. Upon petition to the MDIV Director for thesis extension approval, a student must complete the thesis no more than two years following the end of residence.

Ministry in Church and World INT687

One credit hour each semester — David B. Miller and Allan Rudy-Froese
This is a two-semester internship in the second year of study. Its purpose is to provide students with the opportunity to develop their ministerial identities and to refine their ministering skills in the context of the Christian congregation or community ministry. Students will spend eight to ten hours per week in active ministry, leading worship, preaching, teaching, evangelizing, and providing pastoral care in the congregation, or in activities of the ministry agency in which they work. They will be supervised in the congregation or at the ministry site, by a campus-based peer group and by a faculty supervisor.

Supervised Ministry Experience INT689

One credit hour each semester — David B. Miller
This program provides opportunity for a supervised internship in a congregational or other ministry setting. In the ministry context, the student will explore and develop the range of his or her ministering skills and gifts. The period of time will normally be an intensive three-month Summer or an extended seven or eight months, with the option of an entire calendar year. Students will spend approximately 400 hours in this internship for every three credit hours. Ministry in Church and World is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

MA Comprehensive Examination INT606

No credit — Registration required — MA Director
Students in the MA programs normally write a comprehensive examination in the final semester of their course work. They must register in order to take the exam. Faculty members of the department or committee in which the program is lodged compose the examination questions. For details, see the MA Student Manual.

MA Thesis Research INT607

Three hours — MA Director
A student in an MA program may petition to write a thesis instead of a comprehensive examination. In the semester following the approval of a thesis petition and in each subsequent semester the student must register for the MA Thesis Research course until he or she successfully defends the thesis. For details, see the MA Student Manual.

MA Thesis Extension INT607A

No credit — MA Director
If a thesis extension is approved by the MA or MDiv Director, a student must register for Thesis Extension ( 0 credit hours) until the thesis is completed and successfully defended. Any extension will be granted only if progress toward completion of the thesis is demonstrated.

MAPS Integrative Seminar INT667

Annual — Three each for fall and spring semesters — David Miller
This seminar is done in conjunction with a practicum placement in a peace and justice-related agency, program, educational setting, or church. Students work on-site for eight to ten hours per week during the fall and spring semesters and meet weekly with the seminar group for supervision and reflection on the peace theology, ethics, and peacemaking skills expressed through their practicum. During the fall semester students will identify three to four learning goals, analyze their practicum setting, engage salient readings for interpreting their practicum work, identify one spiritual practice that can sustain peace and justice work over a long period of time, and meet regularly with the seminar group. During the second semester students will again identify learning goals, continue meeting with the seminar group, prepare a portfolio of work they have completed through the MAPS program, and write an integrative case study paper that draws together learning from their MAPS coursework and the work of the practicum. In a comprehensive interview students will present their integrative papers and portfolios to the Director of the Peace Studies Program, the Integrative Seminar faculty leader, and/or the student’s adviser before May 1. Students must successfully pass the integration paper and interview to be eligible for graduation.

MAPS/MSW Integrative Seminar  INT668

Annual — Four each for fall and spring semesters — David Miller
This seminar for dual degree MAPS-MSW students is done in conjunction with a joint practicum placement in a peace and justice-related agency or program that meets requirements for both the MAPS program and the Andrews MSW Generalized Field Experience (Year 1). Students work on-site for 12 hours per week for 34 weeks and meet weekly with the seminar group for supervision and reflection on the peace theology, ethics, and peacemaking skills expressed through their practicum. During the fall semester students will identify three to four learning goals, analyze their practicum setting, engage salient readings for interpreting their practicum work, identify one spiritual practice that can sustain peace and justice work over a long period of time, and meet regularly with the seminar group. During the second semester students will again identify learning goals, continue meeting with the seminar group, prepare a portfolio of work they have completed through the MAPS program, and write an integrative case study paper that draws together learning from their MAPS coursework and the work of the practicum. In a comprehensive interview students will present their integrative papers and portfolios to the Director of the Peace Studies Program, the Integrative Seminar faculty leader, and the student’s adviser or other faculty teaching in the area of peace studies before May 1. Students must successfully pass the integration paper and interview to be eligible for graduation.