SCUPE courses for AMBS students

Fall 2014 courses

Eco-Justice: A Vision for a Sustainable City (SCUPE SH 307)

Three hours — Dr. Clinton Stockwell; Pam and Lan Richert
The church has a significant role in developing a holistic vision for a sustainable city as an outworking of the concept of shalom, a just peace. The course will evaluate the three components of sustainable community development: the three E’s of economics, environment and equity (or social justice). Participants will explore the course topic via readings, panel discussions and site visits. Students will have the option of developing a project or ministry proposal that explores a key issue such as energy policy, food production, environmental justice or pollution, and how these challenges relate to the central course themes. Central to the course is the question, “What does it mean to be a sustainable urban community?”

Public Issues in Urban Ministry (SCUPE SH 307)

Three hours — Dr. David Frenchak
We will learn public theology by doing theology. Doing theology begins by identifying the theological issues that underlie urban culture, economy, politics and society. The class will practice a process of theological reflection rooted in an interaction of biblical insight, as it relates to Christology, principalities and powers, and social justice. Exercising prophetic imagination and using the city of Chicago as a learning laboratory, the class will explore what it means to pursue and advance substantive Christian moral values in the midst of systemic injustice and secular society.

Interterm 2014 courses

SCUPE  M 302: Interfaith & Intercultural Ministry Intensive

Three hours —Dr. Shanta Premawardhana & David Frenchak
The world has come to the city. Using the city as a global classroom, this two-week intensive provides students with a practical theology for ministry in a multicultural context, engages biblical study of the early church’s struggle with cultural barriers, encourages respect and appreciation of world-views and value systems different from one’s own, offers anti-racism training, builds skills in movement and communication across cultural divides, and exposes students directly to a wide variety of ministries in diverse cultural settings.

SCUPE S-H 304: Urban Peacemaking in a Culture of Violence

Three hours—Rev. Bill Wylie-Kellermann
This course on Urban Non-violence pursues and deepens the themes opened up by SCUPE’s Congress on Urban Ministry in March 2011. It will address peacemaking in its “full spectrum,” which is to say from direct action and intervention to restorative justice and conflict resolution. Certain skills, such as active listening, circle process, and non-violent practice will be introduced. The pedagogy of this course will involve an interplay between the biblical witness of gospel non-violence, narrative theology, and the experience of practitioners and students.

Spring 2014 courses

Public Theology and the City (SCUPE  BTH303)

Three hours— Dr. David Frenchak
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa.
Public theology in the city is an art form that brings the separate elements of diversity together in a way that images the kingdom of God on earth. Public theology, in contrast with private or individual theology, is a collaborative process best learned in the context of urban diversity where public concerns or issues are found. Together, in partnership with an urban church, the class will learn the basics of the art of doing public theology that leads to redemption and transformation of social sin.

Urban Principalities and the Spirit of the City (SCUPE B-Th 302)

Three hours — Rev. Bill Wylie-Kellermann
Drawing from the ground-breaking theological work of Wink and Stringfellow on the biblical language of “principalities and powers,” this course examines the profound spiritual realities foundational to understanding and transforming the social, economic, and political structures of our urban world.

Christology and Culture (SCUPE M 304)

Three hours — Dr. Jim Perkinson
Employing a narrative hermeneutic, this course explores Christology from a global, cultural and liberation perspective—and its significance for urban ministry. The course cultivates an understanding and appreciation of the diversity of cultural images and models used to elaborate the meaning of Jesus throughout history. Through theological and historical analysis, students engage in an in-depth study of the meaning of Christ’s life-death-resurrection for his contemporaries, the early church, and specifically for this present time in history.

The Art of Prophetic Preaching in the Urban Context  (SCUPE M 306)

Three hours — Dr. David Frenchak and Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III
Freedom to preach in the spirit of the prophets requires preaching with the mind, body, and spirit. Prophetic preaching in the city is an invitation to enter into the redemptive story of the gospel as it is evidenced in our urban world and requires not only a biblical and theological framework but also prophetic imagination, evidenced in a kind of playful energy that has the potential to both delight and shock the listener out of stuck thinking and stuck places while, at the same time, kindling and strengthening hope. We will apply the language and homiletic tools and resources of the arts, theater, and popular culture to describe both the social context of urban life and the preached word.

Restoring Urban Communities (SCUPE S-H 305)

Three hours – Dr. Mary Nelson
June 3-8
Field-based in one of the nationally renowned Christian community development organizations, this course introduces the principles and practices of congregational-based community development. It examines the relationship between biblical faith and community development practice through site visits to exceptional Chicago development models, and identifies the leadership competencies, organizing principles, skills, and resources necessary for an asset-based approach to sustainable community building.

SCUPE Supervised Ministry Practicum (SCUPE S-H 305)

Hours vary — Dr. Garnett Foster
Required for students actively engaged in a ministry internship, the practicum focuses on personal formation for ministry by integrating work in the ministry setting with SCUPE’s academic curriculum. Using a case study approach, it provides a forum for faith sharing, personal self-awareness of gifts and skills for ministry, theological reflection on experience, and peer group reflection on actual ministry in response to the Gospel. It is also the course vehicle for SCUPE’s full-time internship field education/ministry credit. Credit varies by seminary.

Summer 2014 courses

Dimensions and Dynamics of Urban Ministry (SCUPE M 305)

Three hours — Dr. Yvonne Delk
June 3-7, 10-14
Organized as a sequence of city-wide experiential learning opportunities, the course introduces students to congregations and faith-based organizations that bring good news through prophetic ministry. Students have the opportunity to engage in dialogue with urban ministry leaders who offer vision, courage, and hope. Course methodology includes contextual experience, theological reflection, social analysis, and dialogue with significant church leaders and the instructor.

Good News for the City (SCUPE S-H 308)

Three hours – Rev. Bill Wylie-Kellermann
Description TBA

SCUPE Supervised Ministry Practicum (SCUPE S-H 305)

Hours vary — Dr. Garnett Foster
By arrangement
Required for students actively engaged in a ministry internship, the practicum focuses on personal formation for ministry by integrating work in the ministry setting with SCUPE’s academic curriculum. Using a case study approach, it provides a forum for faith sharing, personal self-awareness of gifts and skills for ministry, theological reflection on experience, and peer group reflection on actual ministry in response to the Gospel. It is also the course vehicle for SCUPE’s full-time internship field education/ministry credit. Credit varies by seminary.