Allan Rudy-Froese

  • Assistant Professor of Christian Proclamation

Degrees:

  • B.Th., Canadian Mennonite Bible College, 1986
  • B.A., University of Winnipeg, 1989
  • M.Div., Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminary, 1992
  • Ph.D., Emmanuel College, Toronto School of Theology

Publications:

  • “The preached sermon as a happening of the gospel,” in Vision: A Journal for Church and Theology (Spring 2009)
  • “God’s reconciliation work: A spiritual exercise for preachers,” in Vision: A Journal for Church and Theology (Spring 2007)
  • “On Mennonite preaching: A review article,” in Vision: A Journal for Church and Theology (Fall 2005)
  • “Three days in the belly with Jonah: A preacher’s tale,” Mair Lectures, Trinity College, University of Glasgow, Scotland, March 2009
  • “John Howard Yoder’s theology of grace: A homiletical response,” at Inheriting John Howard Yoder: A new generation examines his thought, Toronto, Ont., May 2007
  • “This preacher has 22 minutes,” ongoing monthly column in Canadian Mennonite, beginning January 2010

Expertise:

Homiletics, especially as it relates to how we integrate both God's grace and Christian ethics in the sermon; rituals in life and in the church; and performance studies including discipleship and the connections between theology and performance studies

Biography:

Allan Rudy-Froese blends a heart for the church, preparation in communicating the Good News of the gospel, and infectious humor to the ministry of teaching students how to communicate with diverse audiences in our current culture. His dissertation brings together homiletics, theology, biblical studies, and performance theory to bear on ethics and grace in Mennonite preaching. Research interests for Allan include Jonah as a source for narrative, poetic and missional preaching; preaching practice and theology among North American Mennonites and the changing landscape of preaching on ethical issues. Allan leads preaching workshops for lay preachers, serves as a coach for individual preachers, and leads seminars for those who preach in the context of para-church organizations, and conference and denominational leadership

Teaching philosophy

"What language shall I borrow to thank thee, dearest friend?” The church responds to the poet’s question by closely listening to the biblical testimony, where words of thanksgiving—as well as words of lament, clarification, and promise—are voiced in a thousand ways. Theology has its ears open to words that name sin, proclaim the good news of Jesus Christ, and explore the mysterious place in between. A theology of the Word dares us to thankfully receive words as God’s good gifts—gifts which beg to be practiced, strung together in evocative ways, and embodied for the sake of the Reign of God."

What students can expect in my course

  • My goal in most class sessions is to "do in class only what should be done in class." While we take some class time to reiterate or discuss assigned readings, much class time is given to play. Call it "play," or "practice," or "praxis" - we understand theory, integrate knowledge, and internalize leadership skills and identity by getting up and doing X, discussing what happened, and then doing X again. Finally, we discuss what happened in a loving and constructive environment.

Congregational engagements

  • I attend Berkey Mennonite Fellowship in Goshen with my wife and our children. I am a member of the education commission, as well as plan and teach adult Sunday school. I also preach, lead worship, and tell the children's story on occasion. Recently I organized an intergenerational talent night at our church.

Resume: