Fall History, Theology and Ethics courses at AMBS

Updated August 2016

Online courses    • Campus courses

Online Courses — Fall 2016

Christian Theology 1  HTE527E

Three hours — Jamie Pitts
This course will begin with the canonical portraits of Jesus, the doctrines concerning him that arose in the early church, and the centrality of the reign of God in his life and teaching. From there we will move into the development of Trinitarian thought. In this light, the course will explore revelation and the Bible, creation, human nature, and salvation. (MDiv 2, 5, 6; MACF 1, 2; MAPS 1, 2; MATS 1, 2, 3, 4)

History of Christianity in Africa  HTE537E

Three hours — James Krabill
This online course will examine the history, mission dynamics and changing demographics of the African church. Beginning with biblical reflections, the study will highlight the expansion of the African Christian movement, the impact of the Western colonial encounter, contextualized forms of the faith, and issues facing the church today. Students can choose to examine particular issues such as interfaith conversations, the African-initiated churches, women’s roles, worship trends, or the holistic witness of the church.
 

Campus Courses — Fall 2016

Anabaptist History and Theology  HTE520

Three hours — Jamie Pitts
A descriptive and analytic study of the settings, ideas, and personalities that shaped Anabaptism within the context of early sixteenth-century church and society. Bearing in mind the social and political setting, the course will highlight doctrine, ethics, mission, sacramental life, and spirituality in various streams of Anabaptism, noting their common and contrasting characteristics. The relevance of this heritage for contemporary ecumenical, doctrinal, congregational, and personal life will be assessed. (MDiv 2, 5; MACF 1, 2; MAPS 1, 2, 6; MATS 1, 2, 3, 4)

Christian Attitudes Toward War, Peace, and Revolution  HTE644

Three hours — Janna Hunter-Bowman
Christian convictions should make a difference in the way we think about violence, but Christians from biblical times to the present have disagreed about God’s will concerning war. This survey course will pay special attention to the originality of Jesus’ ministry, perspectives on just war theory, the evolution of peace concerns in diverse cultural settings, and possibilities for thinking beyond the just war/pacifism binary today. (MDiv 2, 5; MAPS 2, 4, 5; MATS 1, 3, 4, 6)

Christian Theology 1  HTE527

Three hours — Jamie Pitts
This course will begin with the canonical portraits of Jesus, the doctrines concerning him that arose in the early church, and the centrality of the reign of God in his life and teaching. From there we will move into the development of Trinitarian thought. In this light, the course will explore revelation and the Bible, creation, human nature, and salvation. (MDiv 2, 5, 6; MACF 1, 2; MAPS 1, 2; MATS 1, 2, 3, 4)

Christianity in Canada and the United States  HTE603

Three hours — Lois Barrett Cancelled
A critical and comparative survey of the multiple related stories of the North American churches and movements, noting developments in practice and thought, and points of similarity and difference. A heavier emphasis will be placed on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (MDiv 2, 5; MACF 1; MAPS 1; MATS 1, 2, 4)

Philosophical Theology  HTE631

Three hours — Andy Brubacher Kaethler
Students will examine some of the significant links between Western philosophy and Christian theology. Issues in philosophical theology include the nature and knowledge of God; the being and existence of God; the nature and authority of religious experience and language, of moral obligation, of tradition and Scripture, and of modern sciences; the problem of evil; and truth and religions.  (MDiv 2, 4, 5; MACF 1, 2; MAPS 1, 4; MATS 1, 2, 6)

Suffering and Hope  HTE636

Three hours — Malinda Berry
The inevitability of suffering and the persistence of hope are two components of Christian faith that many people have direct experience of—we often say that suffering makes our faith stronger. But whether it is genocide, slavery, forced displacement, or domestic violence, the church has a good deal of explaining to do: how and why have Christian institutions championed the virtue of suffering? Even when the church is on the side of the oppressed, why does suffering persist? These questions will be at the center of discussion in this seminar-style course where we will bring Anabaptism’s martyr heritage into dialogue with theological perspectives that challenge the belief in suffering’s redemptive power. Prerequisite: Christian Theology I. (MDiv 2; MACF 7; MAPS 1; MATS 2)

Witness Colloquium  HTE534

One hour — Janna Hunter-Bowman
This colloquium is for MAPS and other students interested in peace and justice issues related to the church’s witness with regards to nonviolence and its interaction with other religions. It provides a setting for sharing information and assessing aspects of the church’s witness; for encouraging the integration of discernment, action, reflection, and evaluation as they relate to the witness of peace and justice; and for nurturing a corporate identity as Christian witnesses. Meetings are primarily presentations and discussions of interest to participants. The colloquium serves as a forum for the research projects of advanced MAPS students. Students must register to receive credit, but students may attend without registering.