Upcoming courses for admitted students

The following courses are only for students who have been admitted to one of AMBS’s degree or certificate programs. See a list of courses that are open to nonadmitted students.

Note: The following courses cannot be audited.

Questions? Contact the Registrar’s Office, or download the current course list and block schedule for details.

Semester One, 2020–21

Campus courses: Sept. 1 – Dec. 11, 2020
Tuition due: Aug. 31, 2020

Hybrid courses: Aug. 3 – Dec. 11, 2020 (online portion)
Hybrid week on campus Aug. 17–22, 2020
Tuition due: July 27, 2020

Orientation and Leadership Formation

Two credit hours — Faculty

The LEAP hybrid course orients students to community life at AMBS, theological study, and formation for ministry. Students complete readings, assignments, and activities before arriving on campus for a week of intensive sessions. During that week, from noon Monday to noon Saturday, students are engaged full time (40–45 hours) in various plenary sessions, discussions, and learning experiences. After this week, students do additional readings and assignments.

MA Formation and Assessment

One credit hour — Andy Brubacher Kaethler, PhD

Students register for the MACF project for two consecutive semesters. In the first semester, students plan and receive approval for their final project. In the second semester, they implement and evaluate the project and meet with the faculty project supervisor and the second reader. Students integrate biblical, theological, and historical knowledge with pedagogical, spiritual, and performative competence in the fulfillment of the project.

Three credit hours — Janna Hunter-Bowman, PhD

MATPS students complete a full-time semester-long internship in a location approved by the Peace Studies Director. The internship site must have a qualified supervisor to guide and evaluate the student’s learning and growing competence in peacebuilding work. Two online modules are required during the internship: one on compiling field notes sufficient for further analysis (INT673); and one on spiritual practices for sustaining the work of peacebuilding (INT674). It is recommended that students take Practicing and Embodying Nonviolence before the internship.

One and a half credit hours — Janna Hunter-Bowman, PhD

This module introduces ethnographic notes methodology and intersecting insights relevant to peacebuilding and ethics. It is premised on the conviction that ethnographic participation can deepen understandings of personal, organizational, social-political, and peacebuilding processes that the student encounters in her or his internship. Ethnographic practice also provides a venue to reflect on classroom learning and an opportunity to grow in attentiveness to the self in relation to others and the broader context. In short, the module content encourages students to develop the observational skills and disposition of a mature reflective practitioner.

One and a half credit hours — Janna Hunter-Bowman, PhD

This module addresses a simple yet often neglected reality: we bring a complex bundle of issues from our own vast reservoir of experiences with us to the daily work of peacebuilding. Some of the most difficult experiences that occur in the course of peacebuilding involve uncomfortable personal issues that get stirred up and brought to the surface. Challenges on the level of the self affect the work of change on other levels (interpersonal, societal, structural). Accordingly, this module is designed as a self-study to help students tend to their inner life by introducing practices that can help to cultivate and sustain a whole self and by providing a space to explore these practices.

MDiv Ministry Formation and Assessment

One credit hour — Andy Brubacher Kaethler, PhD

This seminar directs MDiv students in the completion of their formation portfolio and ministry case study paper. It helps prepare students for the senior interview and for completion of the senior ministry assessment. This seminar provides the structure for students to focus intentionally on their growth and integration in the pedagogies of knowing, doing, and being, with particular attention to their anticipated ministry vocation.

Three credit hours — Weds, 1:30–4:30 p.m.

The primary content for this two-semester course is the student’s experience in an 8- to 10-hour-per-week ministry internship. This context provides a setting for the student to test and refine ministry skills, develop ministerial identity, and grow in self-awareness and confidence as a practitioner. The student may do the internship in a congregation, church institution, or community service agency under the supervision of an experienced practitioner. Weekly classes led by an AMBS faculty member focus on fostering the skills of theological and ethical reflection on the practice of ministry; peer consultation; and the development of healthy personal boundaries. Students must submit an application to the Missional Leadership Development Director and be advanced to candidacy for the MDiv degree by the faculty after completing 11 credit hours at AMBS.

Three credit hours — Rebecca Slough, PhD

The SME is a 400-hour professional internship served in a congregation, church institution, or community service agency under the supervision of an experienced practitioner. Students may complete the SME on either an intensive basis (full time) or an extended basis (over two semesters). The SME site and supervisor are arranged in consultation with the Missional Leadership Development Director. Students must submit an application to the Missional Leadership Development Director and be advanced to candidacy for the MDiv degree by the faculty after completing 11 credit hours at AMBS. Ministry in Church and World is recommended as a prerequisite.

Thesis

Three credit hours — Andy Brubacher Kaethler, PhD

Students enrolled in the MDiv program with a Theological Studies major may petition to write a thesis. If the petition is approved, the student must register for this research course in the next two semesters and, if necessary, MDiv Thesis Extension for up to two semesters after that, until he or she completes and successfully defends the thesis. Students must complete the thesis in two years or less. For more information and instructions, see the MDiv Manual.