Upcoming courses

Student Sophia Austiin and professor Safwat Marzouk, PhDWant to explore seminary study?

At AMBS, students may take up to two courses for credit without having been admitted to one of our degree or certificate programs, with a limit of one course per term.

If you are not an admitted student at AMBS and not enrolled at another seminary, college or university, your first AMBS course for credit is 50 percent off regular tuition rates. (Grebel and CMU students, see this exception.) 

If you’d like to take one of the courses listed below, choose the registration form that best applies to you at this link:

Campus courses that are open to auditors are designated below either with "Open to auditors" or "Auditors: consult with instructor." (Online, blended and hybrid courses cannot be audited.) See also FAQ: Auditing courses.

Questions? Contact the Registrar's Office, or download the current course list and block schedule for details. (Please note that the courses listed below are entry-level courses without prerequisites. The complete list of course offerings is available here.) 

Intensive Term, 2019–20

Hybrid Session

May 4 – July 17, 2020 (online portion)
Hybrid week on campus: June 1–6, 2020
Tuition due: April 27, 2020

Hybrid courses begin and end with online assignments and interactions. Students are expected to be on campus for one scheduled week during the course for face-to-face interactions with other students and faculty; this allows students to meet the residency requirements of AMBS’s accrediting agency.

Three credit hours — Andy Brubacher Kaethler, PhD

This course provides an introduction to the Christian experience of God through representative figures and movements, in private devotion and public worship, from the post-apostolic era to the present. The focus will be primarily on the churches of the West. Themes covered will include prayer, contemplation, confession, and discipleship. Movements covered include monasticism, late medieval women’s writings, and pietism.

Campus Session 1

May 4–21, 2020
Tuition due: April 27, 2020

Face-to-face courses meet on the AMBS campus in Elkhart. Classroom sessions have accompanying assignments outside of each class session. While these courses have online requirements, classroom learning is a central element of the course. Download a course list and block schedule.

Three credit hours — Janna Hunter-Bowman, PhD — Mon–Fri, 8:30–11:30 a.m. — Auditors: consult with instructor

How do lived theological thought and practice shape violent conflict and peace? Colombia, South America, is the context for the course query. Many people inside and outside of Colombia were shocked by Colombian Christian churches’ self-congratulatory celebration of the “no” vote to the internationally acclaimed peace agreement in 2016. Drawing on stories and experiences of faithful Colombian Christians of diverse theological and political vantage points, this course explores theology, religion, and ethics in conflict and peacebuilding. It emphasizes the importance of applied ethics and lived religion while also taking theology and peace studies theory seriously. The class brings together conversations that are often compartmentalized in literature and curricula: Christian identity, Christian ethics, and theology, on one hand; and conflict transformation, peacebuilding frameworks, and state-oriented peace processes, on the other. It provides frameworks to help students design change initiatives and peace processes within conflict settings that align with God's shalom and move towards a just peace.

Campus Session 2

June 8–25, 2020
Tuition due: June 1, 2020

Face-to-face courses meet on the AMBS campus in Elkhart. Classroom sessions have accompanying assignments outside of each class session. While these courses have online requirements, classroom learning is a central element of the course. Download a course list and block schedule.

Three credit hours — Allan Rudy-Froese, PhD — Mon–Fri, 8:30–11:30 a.m. — Auditors: consult with instructor

Since narrative is an essential form of Hebrew and Christian scriptures, storytelling is an important way of interpreting the Bible and communicating its message. In this course we will learn to embody biblical stories in a variety of styles for a variety of purposes. Whether they are used for worship, preaching, teaching, pastoral care, or for fun, biblical stories are the building blocks of our Christian faith.

Three credit hours — Malinda Elizabeth Berry, PhD — Mon–Fri, 8:30–11:30 a.m. — Auditors: consult with instructor

This course focuses on helping students learn and/or further their skills as reflective practitioners who integrate knowing, being, and doing in service of their commitment to peace theo-ethics. Nonviolence is more than an idea, and it is also more than an ideal; it is a set of values and beliefs we express with our bodies. This course is also shaped by Richard J. Foster’s Streams of Living Water — the six spiritual traditions of Christian faith. We will focus on the social justice tradition in particular, the stream of Christianity that transforms us to live the Compassionate Life. More than an expression of activism, Christian nonviolence is an expression of the Compassionate Life. This is the reality students will explore by putting nonviolence into physical, emotional, and spiritual practice using Anabaptist understandings of incarnation, theological anthropology, atonement, and reconciliation as the theological foundation of our work. The theoretical components of the course include nonviolent communication, confessional Bible study, and theopoetics. Open to all students, this course is recommended before the MATPS Internship.