Practicing Reconciliation

Practicing Reconciliation provides a blog space to pose hard questions and test possibilities as we form a storm-worthy moral canopy for these anxious, precarious and violently polarized times. We need a moral canopy under which we can stand together, even with our differences. We need a moral canopy to provide faith communities with the resilience to withstand the onslaught of the storm, and to provide compassionate, just leadership on behalf of those most at risk. Such a canopy can only be woven of hard-won convictions, usually forged in crucibles of suffering and tested with strenuous, respectful and socially embodied argumentation until proven storm-worthy — and worthy of the gospel of Jesus Christ. In her Practicing Reconciliation blog, AMBS president Sara Wenger Shenk, prods us to move beyond polarized thinking toward wholeness and abundant life in Christ, who is our peace.

Sara Wenger Shenk, Ed.D., reflects on the question, "What does it mean to leave well?," after her nine-year term as AMBS president.

A post by our newest faculty member about how he thinks AMBS is “uniquely positioned to cultivate and empower the next generation of global Anabaptist leaders.”

Too political — or not

June 13, 2018

These perilous times require all of us, both liberal and conservative, to be political like Jesus.

Where does AMBS stand?

November 14, 2017

Taking a stand means learning to read the Scriptures prayerfully and skillfully, with humility and awe.

Sara Wenger Shenk offers prayers for mercy, peace and courage following the violence in Charlottesville.

What are the hard things we can and must do to rebuild community and rally around shared mission?

Every risk we take on behalf of God’s reconciling mission in the world, we take in the power and joy of Jesus’ resurrection.

President Sara Wenger Shenk reflects on sources of beauty that provide “a fragment of sturdy ground to stand on” in the uproar of these days.

In his guest post, Safwat Marzouk, PhD, associate professor of Old Testament, encourages us to remember our stories of migration and invasion in order to cultivate empathy for others.

What is the kind of "storm-worthy moral canopy" that can help faith communities to wrestle well with what matters?

A cold and broken hallelujah

November 15, 2016

Perhaps all we can manage today is a cold and broken hallelujah. But tomorrow we must unite as a church worth its salt.

A reflection on Isaiah 40 in a time when comfort seems in short supply.

Please note: This reflection references an incident of sexual abuse. "But I've ...

When I called my parents on their 72nd wedding anniversary in early July, mother told m...

Leading with moral authority takes uncommon courage in these fractious times. Who has t...

Truth be told, I assiduously avoid watching or listening to the leading contender for t...

A Call to Arms

December 10, 2015

It is time for a call to arms. No, not the kind you think. Not the kind that has a C...

In late September, many of us were enthralled by a rare celestial display: a super moon...

Worthy is the Lamb

October 1, 2015

I awoke this morning, longing for leaders with vision that transcend our debilitating, ...

Contrary to popular opinion, theology—pondering the relationship between created ...

Written Saturday July 25, 2015 Anger doesn’t need to be bottled up, avoided, d...

I find great joy in featuring AMBS’s young, smart, spirited and faith-filled facu...

(a 40th anniversary tribute to Gerald) It’s one of my husband’s favorite...

by David B. Miller I am pleased to post “Living into the Tension…&rdquo...

I am pleased to post this heart-wrenching lament (first shared as a chapel sermon) from...